Hindi classics that tangible a decade: 1960s Bollywood was frothy, ideally in balance with a high spirits of a overhanging times


bollywood, Bollywood classics, 1960 Bollywood, 1960s Bollywood, Shammi Kapoor, Rajesh Khanna, Mughal-E-Azam, Bandini, Guide, Junglee, An Evening in Paris, Teesri Manzilbollywood, Bollywood classics, 1960 Bollywood, 1960s Bollywood, Shammi Kapoor, Rajesh Khanna, Mughal-E-Azam, Bandini, Guide, Junglee, An Evening in Paris, Teesri Manzil The 1960s revelled in colour, confidence and flamboyance. The untroubled leisure and devil-may-care opinion of a Swinging Sixties gave many immature and gifted filmmakers a height to examination and put themselves out there.

In Hindi cinema, a 1960s was a decade of unconditional hedonism, of livewire amour epitomized by Shammi Kapoor, of a henceforth snow-clad Shimla, bouffant-sporting heroines and a presentation of a formerly secret modernity. If a 1950s Bollywood voiced a angst and finish of a newly Independent India and was mostly a nation-building exercise, a 1960s revelled in colour, confidence and flamboyance. The untroubled leisure and devil-may-care opinion of a Swinging Sixties gave many immature and gifted filmmakers a height to examination and put themselves out there. Whether it was Vijay Anand’s Hitchcockian noirs, Shakti Samanta’s travel-fuelled romcoms (before Rajesh Khanna happened to him) or Nasir Hussain’s frothy cappuccinos, a ubiquitous mood in a 1960s was light and breezy.

The decade had no place for Guru Dutt’s misanthropy and suffering. Note how in reduction than 10 years, Pyaasa’s (1957) elegant malediction opposite a complicated consumerist universe had spin out-dated, as Bollywood changed to a mountain stations with a singing and dancing favourite who had shopped his possess dress during his European tarry and a Western-leaning heroine, customarily a product of affluence. It is revelation that a decade began with K Asif’s chronological behemoth Mughal-E-Azam and finished with Aradhana, imprinting Rajesh Khanna’s superstardom. From Dilip Kumar to Rajesh Khanna, a Hindi film favourite had trafficked a good distance.

Aradhana

Aradhana

In a second of a letter array ‘Hindi classics that tangible a decade,’ The Indian Express looks behind during a 1960s inventory down 10 insubordinate classics from a decade that was childish and expansive in tinge with no time for anything bleak.

Mughal-E-Azam (1960)

Mughal-E-Azam

Mughal-E-Azam

K Asif’s grand epic Mughal-E-Azam is a ultimate story of cursed love. Prithviraj Kapoor plays Emperor Akbar who uses all his competence to conceal a “illicit love” between his son, heir-to-the-Mughal-throne Prince Salim (Dilip Kumar) and a squalid concubine called Anarkali (Madhubala). Anarkali’s intrepid rebuttal of Akbar gives Mughal-E-Azam some of a many iconic confrontational moments. Dilip Kumar underplays methodically, creation a elegant Prince Salim a ideal foil to Prithviraj Kapoor’s melodramatic representation and a love-struck Madhubala’s ardent opening that has done Mughal-E-Azam her crowning glory. “Mughal-e-Azam is a reverence to a imagination, tough work and luxuriance of a maker,” Filmfare wrote in a examination of a film. The same could be pronounced about a peerless star expel and Naushad’s stellar music.

Chaudhvin Ka Chand (1960)

Chaudhvin Ka Chand

Chaudhvin Ka Chand

The final of Guru Dutt’s good works, Chaudhvin Ka Chand is a expensively mounted Muslim amicable play set in Lucknow. Two best friends tumble in adore with a potential beauty – Jameela played masterfully by Waheeda Rehman. On surface, that looks like boilerplate. Author and Guru Dutt consultant Nasreen Munni Kabir even described Chaudhvin Ka Chand as Dutt’s “most conventional” story and treatment. But what if we told we that one male falls in adore with his best friend’s wife? Though Guru Dutt didn’t strictly approach Chaudhvin Ka Chand, a frames bear his observable stamp. The film’s pretension strain is used even currently to report Waheeda Rehman’s classical beauty and delicate grace.

Junglee (1961)

Junglee

Junglee

Did modernity arrive in Hindi cinema during a accurate impulse when an Elvis Presley-esque Shammi Kapoor slid down a snow-capped hills of Shimla resounding “Yaahoo”? The answer might not curve towards a certain though Junglee was really a cry for leisure not seen in Hindi cinema before. In Junglee, Kapoor, maybe Bollywood’s initial dancing star, pennyless a shackles of his determined mom to try out to find adore and freedom. For Kapoor who brought joie de vivre into a cinema of a 1960s, a elementary interpretation of Junglee could be – this man’s going to mangle all rules. And he did.

Gunga Jumna (1961)

Gunga Jumna

Gunga Jumna

When Amitabh Bachchan claims that he has learnt some-more about behaving from this Dilip Kumar classical than any other film it creates we consternation about a place that Gunga Jumna occupies in Hindi cinema. For starters, Bachchan’s mania with Gunga Jumna has some-more to do with Kumar’s near-perfect poise of a Awadhi dialect. A self-confessed fan of a thespian, a UP-born Bachchan has voiced astonishment and warn as to how “a male who’s not from Allahabad and Uttar Pradesh” could get all a nuances of Awadhi so right. Bachchan might be articulate quite as a fan, about a film and opening that has oral privately to him, though Gunga Jumna’s genuine change can be felt on writers Salim-Javed who indeed took that impulse right into a heart of their scripts. The result? Deewaar and Trishul.

Bandini (1963)

Bandini

Bandini

Was Bimal Roy a feminist filmmaker? He would positively be described as one if he were operative today. Roy’s absolute paper to freedom, love, ideals and destiny, Bandini is widely hailed as his swansong. Kalyani (Nutan) is a C-class invalid portion a murder term. Against a backdrop of her vivid past, Roy interweaves a together story of a jail alloy (an maudlin Dharmendra) who falls in adore with Kalyani. Nutan who delivered a career-defining spin in Roy’s Sujata in 1959 outclasses herself here in a opening of such high and elementary beauty that Bandini is now hold as one of a many decisive womanlike roles in Hindi cinema.

Waqt (1965)

Waqt

Waqt

Lost and found was invented by Gyan Mukherjee in Kismet (1943), starring Ashok Kumar and polished 3 decades after by Manmohan Desai in Amar Akbar Anthony (1977). But few can repudiate that a device was law by Yash Chopra in Waqt. A multi-starrer during a time when solo favourite films dominated a marquee, it is Chopra’s third and one of his many personal films. Led by Balraj Sahni as a patriarch, Waqt is a story of a family broken and replaced by an trembler (some critics have interpreted a healthy disaster as a embellishment for Partition, a thesis that a Lahore-born Chopra had championed before strictly branch into Bollywood’s amour king) and all actors, including stalwarts like Raaj Kumar, Sunil Dutt, Shashi Kapoor, Sharmila Tagore and Madan Puri, get notable roles. The large family reunion does start during a end, streamer to a happy ending.

Guide (1965)

Guide

Guide

Vijay Anand’s Guide starts with mystic visuals of Dev Anand streamer towards his capricious future. Raju Guide (Anand) has usually been expelled from jail. As SD Burman’s Wahan kaun hai tera rings in a title, Guide has already done we a guarantee of a rarely philosophical and devout tour of this squalid traveller guide, ensnared by a attracts of Rosie (Waheeda Rehman), a many radical of all Bollywood heroines. Although formed on R K Narayan’s Guide a final film isn’t anything like a book. The reason? Vijay Anand’s singular and personal interpretation of a content finish with a higher low-pitched sensibilities of SD Burman and Shailendra.

Teesri Manzil (1966)

Teesri Manzil

Teesri Manzil

Legend has it that after Dev Anand incited down Teesri Manzil, destined by his thriller-specialist hermit Vijay Anand (based on a Nasir Hussain script), a film landed miraculously on Shammi Kapoor’s lap. Back in 1957, Dev Anand had incited down another film called Tumsa Nahin Dekha, eminent for creation Shammi Kapoor into an overnight star. “I combined my biggest rival. With each film we let go, he (Shammi Kapoor) shot to fame,” Anand once quipped, woeful his preference to travel out of Teesri Manzil. A murder mystery, Teesri Manzil has all a classical Vijay Anand hallmarks – fast-paced story, murder, intrigue, whodunit and not to mention, a memorable songs.

Jewel Thief (1967)

Jewel Thief

Jewel Thief

 

Vijay Anand’s many Hitchcokian of thrillers, Jewel Thief has all a mixture of a well-made and enchanting thriller – a timely thrills and twists, a drama, amour and indeterminate characters. And then, there are a songs, majestically and imaginatively shot a approach usually Vijay Anand – called a master of strain picturisation – could have. The film starts with a montage of news clippings about a scandalous valuables burglar whose puzzling ways have confused a military and set panic among a public. From a early scenes, a assembly is being done to theory about a temperament of a valuables burglar and all hints indicate towards Vinay (Dev Anand), Bombay military commissioner’s son who Shalu (Vyjayantimala) and her elder hermit Arjun Singh (Ashok Kumar) credit of being a duplicitous Amar.

Upkar (1967)

Upkar

Upkar

Much before Akshay Kumar, Sunny Deol and a likes wore their nationalistic hearts on their sleeves there was Manoj Kumar aka Mr Bharat. Upkar, a vital exile success, is Kumar’s direct stipulation of his adore for India. Inspired by Lal Bahadur Shastri’s famous Jai Jawan Jai Kisan slogan, Upkar is an instance of a some-more robust code of nationalism that couldn’t have been out of place in today’s India. With Upkar, Kumar polished his loyalist persona, both on shade and off it.

(Shaikh Ayaz is a author and publisher formed in Mumbai)

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